Book Review: The Shadow of His Hand

Reading ‘The Shadow of his Hand’ was an unexpected pleasure – it’s rare to find a first novel that can pull me into the story so capably.

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In this epic fantasy, the Jerikan armies are camped on the border of the allied kingdoms and war seems inevitable. When a baby is born with a prophesied mark, the young King Eldilin dares not defy the Unseen God but must send his sister and the babe on a dangerous quest.

Fredrick is a directionless young man who enlisted as a soldier because it “seemed like the right thing to do”. With his uncanny ability to calm the screaming child, he’s an unlikely and reluctant addition to Princess Kathryn’s company. Can they beat the odds and complete the prophecy?

For the genre, I thought the plot proceeded at a fast pace, with never a dull moment, and the world-building was quietly effective (if hazy on the geographical details). The stand-out for me, though, was the characters. There was something appealing in Fredrick’s assessment of himself as an ordinary man out of his depth, and honesty and humour in the way he coped as fate stretched him to his limits and beyond.

Shifts of point of view from the main protagonists to other plot threads were also effectively managed, maintaining my attention. In particular, I became quite absorbed in the secondary plot revolving around the King and his unexpected bride, a meeting of singularly unusual personalities.

Overall, this was a diverting read. I’m looking forward to reading the next installment, though less to see how the war will proceed than to be involved in the developing relationships between the characters.

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Review of Riversend by Sylvia Kelso

This was breathtaking.

I read the previous book, Amberlight, and enjoyed the beautiful prose and the imagination at work. A city run by women and the mysterious sentient stone, querrique, is thrown into chaos by the arrival of a stranger. In places, I found the plot hard to follow, but by the end I was so caught up in the unique love story I just wanted more.

Riversend was an easier read – the prose has more clarity without losing its poetic qualities, bringing to life a different world, and the story is strong in its exploration of relationships under pressure.

Tellurith and her House are in exile after the destruction of the querrique, around which their society was based. Now she must lead her people, not only to safety, but through an upheaval in gender roles and traditions. At the heart of this is the struggle of her two husbands to accept their new roles, at odds with their upbringing.

I was a little thrown in places by plot twists that seemed to come out of nowhere, but it didn’t matter too much. The strength of the story was in the depth of moral integrity displayed by the main characters, and the exploration of their choices under intense and competing pressures of love and duty.

It is also a reflective tale on gender roles, an interesting mirror to our own society. In places, where actions shocked or surprised me, especially the depiction of sexual violence, I tried turning it around – if genders had been reversed, would I have felt the same? And when the answer was ‘no’, why not?

If you like fantasy based around mature, strong-willed characters, or are interested in gender roles and expectations, I think you’ll enjoy this.

The Magical Realism of Raymond St. Elmo

In this post, I want to introduce you to self-published author Raymond St. Elmo (Raymond Holland). He writes ‘magical realism’, about which I have no idea, except to observe that his stories mindbendingly blur the boundaries between reality and dream.

He’s not afraid to play with the occasional metaphor, I like that, but what appeals most to me is the humour in his writing.

Read his books if you have a love of stories, especially stories of the kind which play games with reality. His writing references and extends literary traditions and he clearly revels in the magic of the written word.

Find out more about Raymond at his site here: http://raymondstelmobooks.com

And below are my Amazon reviews of his books – two books in two different styles, but with a solid thread of connection. Check them out here: https://www.amazon.com

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The Origin of Birds in the Footprints of Writing

In which our hero, having worked hard to achieve a respectable degree of seriousity, discovers a clue to a lost manuscript written in the footprints of birds. A self-imposed quest to decipher its meaning sends him tumbling down a rabbit-hole of dreams within dreams, pitting wits against dead authors, human and ornithological.

A story about the transcribing of stories, told with wit, humour, and a touch of magic.

(Especially recommended for those of us who work in cubicles, neglect most of our emails, and are supposed to be in a meeting).

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Letters from a Shipwreck in the Sea of Suns and Moons

I have no idea how to describe this book. It’s the sort of fantasy in which you can get lost, escaping from this world to another.

In this other world is a doomed ship with a terrifying cargo, a crew of incompetents, and two mysterious books. There is a failed poet, dreaming of his girl left behind, arguing Blake with the murderous, conversing with gods, courting lightning and dancing with the undead. There are puzzles and mortal dangers and a quest, of sorts.
It’s a story within a story, with even the narrator of this tale a mystery. Is he the blind old man the unseen interviewer claims him to be?

Read this if you pine for love and adventure, if you enjoy the uncovering of sly deceptions and deeper truths, or need an injection of wit and humour. Great stuff.

Review of Harsh Lessons by LJ Kendall

Being Tamed or Growing Up?

I received a free copy of this book in return for an honest review.

This book continues the story of Leeth, groomed by her adopted Uncle Harmon to be an archetypical huntress, as she grows from teenager to young woman. Now she is being trained within the secure subterranean facilities of the Department, honing her fighting skills and being pushed to learn other, more difficult, lessons. How can this wild child be taught the social skills, not just to blend into normal society, but to take on the range of personas a mission might require? And what is the motivation behind the evil menace that stalks the streets, The Breaker? In this book, we see Leeth’s transformation from child to adult.

My first comment on this book has to be a warning: like the first in the series, it treads a thin line in its portrayal of violence and sexual abuse within a story intended as entertainment. For me, it hovered on the edge in places, but was saved towards the end by Leeth’s growth, and her budding sense of moral responsibility.

I also felt that more background to the characters and organisations would have helped to establish their motivations. For instance, what is the Department was trying to achieve? Why do they want Leeth badly enough to train her, on an individual basis, for more than a year? Perhaps my understanding of the socio-political situation was inadequate to fully grasp their goals.

The plot revolving around The Breaker felt underdeveloped, too. It was a little disappointing to finish this book with no greater understanding of this part of the plot than I had at the end of book 1.

Don’t let these perceived flaws put you off, though. Leeth is an interesting character tested by a variety of threats both mental and physical and I found her story an absorbing read.

 

 

Review of Contagion: Eyre by Alison Sinclair

What do you get when you mix sci fi and medicine? You get the Plague Confederacy Series, possibly the only example of Medical Space Opera.

After mixed feelings  about the first book in the series, Breakpoint: Nereis, I’m not entirely sure why I picked up this one, but I’m glad I did, there was much to love. It was not an easy read – it took me weeks, taking it in small chunks – but I stuck with it because it intrigued me. Here’s why:

It does that wonderful space opera thing of putting us onto a whole new world and a society at once different from ours and believable. In this book, we have a post-plague society with a medical-based theology, melding the concepts of physical and spiritual ‘stain’. Those who dare to question why power rests entirely with the Caducean Order are subject to mind-altering drug treatments known as ‘mercies’ by psychopractors. Those who work with the dead, the necropractors, must ritually cleanse themselves.

So when the confederacy team arrive wishing to study their gravesites, right in the middle of a revolutionary uprising, they are quickly accused of doing the work of the Adversary.

Like the first book in the series, the story is told through a variety of major characters. This was one of the reasons I found it a hard read, because it was a big ask to develop a strong enough bond with each of these characters to handle all the changes in point of view. I kept feeling that it would work wonderfully as a television series, with more visual clues to bring these people and their environment fully to life.

What I particularly liked was that we spent more time in the pov of my favourite character, Teo, the ninety-something-year-old no-nonsense doctor with surgical tools embedded in her prosthetic hand. She’s wonderful.

Altogether, this was sort-of great and sort-of flawed, at once an intriguing and frustrating read. I’d recommend it for the unique melding of medical, spiritual and political manoeuvrings.

 

Review of The Seventh Friend by Tim Stead

I really enjoyed reading this.
It has all the elements you expect of an epic fantasy, such as great battles with a good dose of treachery and strategic manoeuvring, a system of magic (involving animals – I like that), and a host of interesting and sympathetic characters. Information about the world is trickled in so that it is not overwhelming, but leaves many questions unanswered. The main plot unfolds at a good pace, with a satisfying conclusion.

I especially liked the main characters of Wolf Narak and Pascha of the sparrows, to the extent that I found myself wishing to see more of them. (Luckily there are more books in the series). The author also surprised me – of two rival characters presented near the start, rather than concentrate on the more sympathetic of the two, he shows us the exploits of his rival. After I overcame my surprise, I enjoyed seeing this character develop.

I felt that the book was not as dark as the blurb might suggest. Essentially it’s a story about ordinary people becoming heroes, and, conversely, about gods who are essentially ordinary people. I can’t help a spoiler, here. There’s a great bit of dialogue in which the “god” Narak confesses that he does not believe in gods.

The “bad guys” the Seth Yarra people are also interesting. The author takes a dig at religious dogma (or so I understood it), by showing how their rigid societal rules, while a source of unity, are ultimately their weakness.

If you are looking for a fresh, new voice in fantasy, this book is a good one to try. I wish it was in paperback, though, as it’s a long one to read on a screen.

Review of Wild Thing by LJ Kendall

(This review has been posted before on Amazon and on the blog Amorina Rose Writes.)

This book has an intriguing premise. Suppose you take a child and make her an experimental subject, moulding her in a particular direction over years of training. Suppose her teacher has magical abilities (and a moral deficit) that allow him to subtly alter her neurological make-up towards this end. And suppose you do this in the surreal atmosphere of an Institution for paranormal dysfunction. What would this girl become?

Warning – this review may contain spoilers

This semi-dystopian fantasy is set in a future in which society is rebuilding after mage-powered storms and a plague, and in which some choose to alter themselves with animal DNA and mind-altering drugs. The girl Sara knows little of this, having been kept secluded by her adopted ‘Uncle’, Doctor Harmon. Within the Institute’s vast grounds, she grows up a wild thing, a huntress. Here she befriends a cybernetic guard dog and learns to feel the spirits of nature and others less friendly.

It’s not long before the girl is exploring the hidden depths of the Institute, drawn to one particular man, claimed to be an insane mage. Her wilful and resourceful nature find her defying layers of security to defend him. But thanks to Harmon’s meddling, Sara herself has become dangerous, displaying a disturbing and uncontrollable mix of naivety and power.

This is a fascinating story, by turns exciting and disturbing, as the reader follows Sara’s development from wild child to adulthood. If I have a criticism, it is that the plot development was overly long and drawn-out. In particular, I felt too many chapters were spent following Sara around the grounds and on a needlessly large number of attempts to assist the incarcerated mage, which reduced my surprise and excitement at the finale. In other respects, though, this is a fine first novel.

I’d recommend Luke Kendall as a new author to watch.